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Turkish Angora cat's breed portrait



Origin and breed history

The Turkish Angora is a medium-sized semi-longhair cat. As its name doubly implies, the cat originates from Turkey. Angora is the old name for the present capital of Turkey, Ankara. Even if it is written twice in the name, the story of origin is not quite told. With Angora cats were still called a good 50 years ago practically all long-haired cats. Later the designation "Persian" became generally accepted for the same cats. Today Persian cats are known everywhere as classics of the longhaired cats.

Several newer breeds have been added, such as the Norwegian Forest Cat, the Ragdoll or the Maine Coon. In the meantime, genetic tests have shown that the longhaired and semi-longhaired cats originate as a large population from the wide areas of Russia as well as the countries bordering to the south and west. Here then Angora or Persian as origin come again into play. The Persian cat displaced the Angora cat, however, only in the designation, not as a cat. Today's Turkish Angora is a variant of the old Angora or Persian cat bred in England in the 1970s.

Allegedly, two white Angora cats from the Ankara Zoo were also used for this purpose. Like the Siberian cat, which probably still represents the original population in its purest form, the Turkish Angora is a semi-longhair cat, but in contrast to its long-haired sisters, it is smaller and more elegantly positioned. In 1988 the Turkish Angora was recognized by the Fédération Internationale Féline (FiFe) and a binding standard was established, which at first only allowed white as coat color. In the meantime, a wide range of colors is allowed in this cat.

Description

The Turkish Angora is a medium sized cat breed. It has an elegant, slender build. According to the standard, her movements should radiate grace, be supple and flowing. It is said to be muscular, but to have a fine build without a pronounced chest. Males are 3 to 5 kilograms, cats somewhat lighter. Their paws should be small and dainty. Their tail should be long and bushy, wider than the body and carried "majestically". The coat of a Turkish Angora is silky and semi-long. It does not have a felted undercoat. Therefore, with the winter coat on the hind legs form dense pants, around the chest and shoulders a dense frizz of hair.

However, this can be seen only in mature specimens from the second year of life. In summer the coat hairs off. At first, only pure white was allowed as coat color. However, since pure white is based on a genetic defect that can be associated with serious health problems such as deafness, blindness and balance disorders, it is not possible to keep a population alive with this. So the restriction to white was dropped. However, coat colors based on other genetic defects, such as the so-called dilute or dilute colors, are allowed today.

Character and nature

The Turkish Angora has a very people-oriented, friendly and gentle nature. She is extremely calm, reassuring and seeks the closeness of her people. She can develop a close bond and is especially suited for people who want to enjoy peace and relaxation together with her. The Turkish Angora is then an amplifier of the relaxation phase. In addition, she is a real family cat. The Turkish Angora is nevertheless attentive and knows her people very well. Turkish Angora are very social and love life best together with their humans. Hustle and bustle can not bring them so quickly from the rest. Of course they like to move in the nature, but they can also be kept exclusively in the apartment. Turkish Angora have a wonderful calming and relaxing aura. They are affectionate, but do not allow themselves to be taken in and remain their own proud personality.

Attitude

A Turkish Angora is the ideal house cat for the apartment. It is undemanding and frugal with regard to its keeping conditions, apart from grooming and healthy breeding. Always seeking a close relationship with her owners, she loves to be with her family. She does not have to be a free roamer to feel completely at home, but does not like to be left alone for long. She is very sociable and gets along well with children, all family friends and animal companions.

Education

The Turkish Angora is very easy to train for a cat, as it is intelligent, calm, social and people-oriented. If it comes from a serious breeder, who has well cared for and socialized the parents and kittens, it will fit into the rules and habits of its family without any problems.

Care and health

The coat of the Turkish Angora should be carefully brushed regularly. This is especially true at times of coat change. Usually Turkish Angora cats love fur brushing and with some feeling and skill you can make it a daily bonding ritual, which is emotionally very good for both cats and humans.

Diseases typical for the breed

Catteries of the Turkish Angora cat can suffer from strong inbreeding. This not infrequently leads to immune deficiencies, sickliness and shortened life expectancy. This breed can also suffer from a number of hereditary diseases that are common to breeders, such as ataxia, where movement is disturbed. Some coat colors can lead to health problems. Pure white specimens in particular may be afflicted with hereditary diseases, such as predispositions to deafness, blindness, balance disorders.

Nutrition/Food

The Turkish Angora is generally a trouble-free eater by feline standards.

Life expectancy

A Turkish Angora is long-lived without breeding exaggerations or coat colors produced by genetic defects. Thus, cats of this breed can live 15 years.

Abyssinian cat's breed portrait

 


Origin and breed history

The Abyssinian cat is a relatively long bred, short-haired, very elegant pedigree cat. Its name suggests that the Abyssinian cat originated in the former North African empire of Abyssinia, now Ethiopia. There is no evidence for this. Rather, like any normal domestic cat, it originally descended from the dun cat and was bred out in England as a pedigree cat. Probably under crossbreeding of Siamese cats it was bred already in the 19th century on the appearance of a desert cat. The zoology professor and cat connoisseur Friedrich Schwangart characterized already in 1954 the Abyssinian cats as "no exotics from Africa, but an English breeding product resembling in some pieces the wild cats there."

The breeding world likes to tell some exotic legends about the origin of their pedigree cats. As a rule, these stories do not stand up to scrutiny. However, this does not detract from the quality of the cats. Quite the contrary: Especially a relatively close descent from a wild cat would only bring problems for their role as a domestic cat. And one cannot deny that the Abyssinian is of impressive elegance and beauty. So she brings everything for a pleasant feline companion. Since 1935 she is also bred in the USA. Because one wanted additionally a variant with longer hair, from the Abyssinian the so-called Somali cat developed, which shares the same standard with it until today. Today, the Abyssinian cat is recognized by all major pedigree cat associations. Already at its foundation in 1949, the Fédération Internationale Féline recognized the Abyssinian cat in one of its first official acts. In Germany, however, it has remained quite rare.

Description

The Abyssinian cat is a small to medium sized short haired cat. It has a lithe, slender but muscular build. It should have a well developed chest according to the standard. Males will weigh 4 to 5, cats 3 to 4 kilograms. The coat is short, fine and closed. It should be springy when touched. It has a special gene variant, which in the result causes the silky impression of the coat. Breeders call this ticking. In a ticked coat, each individual hair shows multiple banding. However, the coat as a whole shows no pattern except just an iridescent silky texture. Recognized colors are all wild colors as well as blue, sorrel, beige-fawn, each also with silver variations. The Abyssinian has strikingly large ears. Their head is wedge-shaped, the eyes are large.

Character and temperament

In appearance, the Abyssinian is a diva. In temperament, she is active, jumpy and persistent, virtually an athlete. She is the opposite of a couch potato among cats. Of course, she also regularly takes her sleep sessions and likes to cuddle with her master and mistress, but she prefers to be sporty. The Abyssinian is not a cat for professionals who are out of the house all day or people who want to share their rest with a cat. On the other hand, an Abyssinian cat is happy when she can play with children or dogs. She is a lot of fun if you enjoy sharing her life-affirming, lively explorations and climbs. She is not a lap cat, but can be cuddly and affectionate towards her human.

Attitude

The Abyssinian cat needs suitable toys and especially plenty of climbing opportunities. In good weather she likes to roam around the garden. However, it can be kept indoors only, if it has enough climbing opportunities, toys and especially play partners. It is recommended to keep them in a group. Abyssinians are a sociable breed and get along with other animal housemates without any problems - provided both sides have the chance to get used to each other.

Education

The Abyssinian cat is intelligent, affectionate and easy to train. If she comes from a reputable breeder who has well cared for and socialized parents and kittens, she will naturally fit into the rules and habits of her family. With a little guidance she will be housebroken quickly and easily.

Care and health

The coat of the Abyssinian cat only needs to be brushed now and then.

Diseases typical for the breed

Sometimes inbreeding can be a problem with this breed. Several hereditary diseases typical of pedigree cats can also occur in Abyssinian cats. In addition, they can suffer from hereditary pyruvate kinase deficiency (PK), a metabolic disease. Treatment is then not possible. Another metabolic disease, Renal Amyloidosis (RA) is also common as well as Progressive Retinal Atrophy (PRA), an eye disease that can lead to blindness. However, these diseases do not necessarily occur in all cats.

German Longhair's breed portrait

 


Origin and breed history

The German Longhair is a medium to large sized longhair cat. It is very close to the original type of the centuries-old longhaired cats of Russia and Europe. Although always rather rare, long-haired domestic cats have been known for a very long time. In Europe they were very highly valued at the courts of the nobility. In the past, all longhaired cats were called Angora cats. But they were different from today's bred longhaired cats like Persian, Maine Coon, Norwegian, Ragdoll or Turkish Angora. From their form they were comparable to normal domestic cats of today, just with a longer coat. Starting from England and France, these cats were bred since the end of the 19th century, however, heavier and chubbier, the heads became larger and especially shorter.

This is how the Persian cat came into being as we know it today. The zoology professor Dr. Friedrich Schwangart, a profound cat connoisseur, who among other things had published the manual with the first standards for pedigree cats in Germany, wanted to save the old type of the longhair. So he drafted the first standard for the Deutsch Langhaar cat in 1929. Since such cats of the old type still existed, already two years after the official breed presentation a Deutsch Langhaar male could be chosen as the Reichssieger of a cat show. With the upheavals of the Second World War these hopeful beginnings were lost for the time being. But there were obviously some remaining stocks until the recent time. In 2005, the Deutsch Langhaar cat was revived and has been bred since then.

It is very important to follow the guidelines and intentions of Professor Schwangart and to revive the vital, healthy longhair cat of the classic type. It looks like one is on a very good way here. Between 2001 and the beginning of 2017, more than 900 Deutsch Langhaarkatzen have already been registered in the stud books of various cat breeding clubs. In April 2012, the Deutsch Langhaar was officially recognized by the World Cat Federation. It is from the formalities the youngest breed cat in Germany, but from its roots even the oldest at all. It is cared for by the "Interessengemeinschaft Deutsch Langhaarkatzen", a subclub of the Deutsche Edelkatze e.V.

Description

The German Longhair cat is a medium to large breed. The standard wants

a large, muscular cat, with a long, rectangular body. The chest is round and well developed, the neck is strong. The legs are of medium length and muscular, the large paws are round, firm and hairy between the pads. The tail is of medium length, thick at the base and tapering slightly to a rounded tip.

Cats have a weight of 3.5 - to 5 kilograms, males from 4.5 to 6. The muzzle should also be rather short, but by no means extreme or even as extreme as seen in today's Persian. The eyes are oval, large and open. They are slightly slanted and widely spaced. In this breed all colors are permitted, as in the coat all colors are permitted. The DeutschLanghaar cat has a long coat, a ruff and knickerbockers. The easy-care coat is of shiny, silky texture and has undercoat. Compared to the Persian cat, the movement of a DeutschLanghaar is more fluid, the legs are slightly longer, the figure less stocky.

Character and temperament

The German Longhair has a very people-oriented, friendly and uncomplicated nature. The Interessengemeinschaft Deutsch Langhaar describes their nature:

Open and with a rather moderate temperament, she goes through life, but without being boring or even phlegmatic. She is sociable, well-balanced and has a pronounced social competence, which is why she usually feels most comfortable in the company of her two- and four-legged family. All this makes it a very suitable cat for apartment keeping, but it also enjoys a safe free run in the garden.

The German Longhair has a wonderful charisma and so is she in her nature.

Attitude

The German Longhair is an ideal house cat. It is undemanding and frugal with regard to its housing conditions. However, it needs a close relationship with its owners. She loves to be with people as well as the animal partners in her family. They are extremely sociable and get along easily with children, all family friends and animal housemates. However, the four-legged friends should have been accustomed to each other with patience. She doesn't have to be an outdoor cat to feel completely at home, but she won't say no to the possibility of roaming around in a garden. As with only a few pedigree cats, with a DeutschLanghaar cat you don't need to worry or feel guilty about possible illnesses caused by breeding or restrictions in the quality of life for your four-legged friend.

Education

The German Longhair cat can be educated very well, because it is intelligent, calm, sociable and people-oriented. If it comes from a reputable breeder who has well cared for and socialized the parents and puppies, it will naturally fit into the rules and habits of its family without any problems.

Care and health

The cat's coat should be brushed regularly.

Diseases typical for the breed

There are no data about diseases spread by breeding in this breed. The commitment of the IG Deutsch Langhaarkatzen gives reason to believe that here, according to the rules of breeding art, everything possible is done to obtain healthy and vital cats and black sheep of breeding, so far at least, have no chance.

Nutrition/Food

The German Longhair is a problem-free eater by cat standards.

Life expectancy

A Deutsch Langhaar should be very long-lived. However, reliable data are not yet available.

Siberian cat's breed portrait

 


Origin and breed history

The Siberian cat, is a strong, primordial semi-longhair cat. In the vast areas of northern Russia, it is said to be common even today as a normal domestic cat. There it is called Sibirskaja Koschka, which simply means Siberian cat, but actually means only the cats with the luxuriant and long fur. In zoological literature it is described very early. Already in 1864 it is mentioned in the first edition of Brehms Tierleben as a long-haired cat from Siberia, just to mention one example. Alfred Brehm should have known what he writes there, because he had traveled Siberia personally for his zoological studies.

Thus, the Siberian cat is one of the oldest domestic cat breeds at all. The Siberian cat descends, like all domestic cats, from the African wild cat or falcon cat, scientifically called "Felis silvestris lybica". Experts still argue how the long coat could spread in the population. In any case, it is very useful in cold weather and also looks very attractive. So it was clear that the friends of pedigree cats all over the world were interested in the Siberian cat.

However, it took a long time before it was bred according to the standard and pedigree book, which was quite good for its health. For several decades now this cat has been bred specifically. Since 1997 the Siberian cat is officially recognized by the Fédération Internationale Féline. It shares the same standard with the Neva Masquarade, recognized since 2011. This is the name given to the point variant of the Siberian cat, which was brought into existence by a purposefully bred-in defect gene.

Description

The Siberian cat is a medium to large semi-longhair cat. It has a very dense coat. The woolly undercoat is covered by water-repellent topcoat. All colors are permitted according to the standard. Cats with point colors (see below) are called Neva Masquarade and since 2011 they are kept as a separate breed. The Siberian cat is often confused with the similar looking Maine Coon cat or the Norwegian Forest Cat. However, it is smaller than the American Maine Coon and less leggy than the Norwegian Forest Cat. The three breeds can also be easily distinguished by their heads.

Compared to the Maine Coon, the head of the Norwegian Forest Cat is much more triangular, while that of the Siberian is broader, shorter and rather round. One must always keep in mind that these differences in physical characteristics are not of natural origin, but have been deliberately bred out in the last decades.

The Siberian cat does not grow quite as large as the other two similar cat breeds. A male cat weighs between 6 and 9 kilograms, the female cat between 4 and 6. The point colors of the Neva Masquarade are produced by a mutation, a so-called partial albinism. As a result, the body fur is lightened, while on the cooler regions of the body, such as the face, ears, legs, tail, the so-called points are formed, which are darker in color. The puppies are born white and only darken later.

Character and temperament

Siberian cats are agile and self-confident. For a pedigree cat, it still has the temperament of the normal domestic cat. It has a comparatively high urge to move and should ideally also be allowed outside in a large, enclosed garden. There she moves with pleasure and skillfully. She climbs very well and is an accomplished hunter. However, this does not mean that she should only be kept as an outdoor cat. She can also be happy as an indoor-only cat.

Her urge to move should then be satisfied by playing games in the apartment. Here the trade offers professional aids. However, the best toys cannot replace the daily closeness to humans. She likes to have other animal roommates as buddies. If a Siberian cat is lovingly socialized from puppyhood, it will develop a very close relationship with its human. It is affectionate and sociable. The Siberian cat is friendly towards children as well as animal roommates coupled with its confident demeanor.

Attitude

In principle, the Siberian cat is to be kept like a normal domestic cat. It has a relatively large urge to move. Ideal is a house with a large garden in which she can regularly sneak and climb around. During her excursions she will occasionally catch a bird or a mouse, because she is a good hunter by nature. Since she is clever and intelligent, observes her surroundings and her people closely, and is also extremely dexterous, she quickly learns to open doors, for example. You have to keep that in mind. Otherwise, she is undemanding and frugal with regard to her housing conditions. However, she needs a close relationship with her owners.

Education

The Siberian cat can be trained very well. One must pay special attention to the fact that she has been carefully socialized from puppyhood, accustomed to people and ideally to other pets. Then she will be very oriented to people. If she comes from a reputable breeder who has taken good care of her parents and kittens, she will fit into the rules and habits of a family with ease and almost by herself. With a little guidance she will be housebroken quickly and easily.

Care and health

The coat of the Siberian cat should be brushed regularly and thoroughly. It changes its coat each winter and summer. Brushing is especially important in the period of coat change. With a little feeling and skill, brushing the coat can be turned into a ritual of social bonding, which is emotionally very good for both cat and human.

Diseases typical for the breed

The Siberian cat is quite a robust breed cat. Due to breeding as a pedigree cat for external characteristics, its population now partly suffers from inbreeding. It is not known how widespread in her the hereditary diseases otherwise common in pedigreed cats are.

Nutrition/Food

The Siberian cat should be a trouble-free eater by feline standards.

Life expectancy

A Siberian cat, healthily bred, can live 12 to 15 or more years with luck.

Buying a Siberian cat

If you want to buy a Siberian cat, you can first look around in animal shelters. Here you can find - although rarely - cats, which correspond to the type and nature of the forest cat. At the breeder you should make sure that parents and puppies grow up in good conditions, especially with a close social connection to the human family. You should look at the pedigree. Here no ancestor should appear twice, in order to exclude too extreme inbreeding. Both parents should be tested negative for the hereditary diseases described above. Serious breeders indicate this in their advertisements. Of course the kittens should be vaccinated, dewormed and chipped several times. A serious bred puppy of the Siberian cat should cost around 700 Euro.


Sphynx cat's breed portrait

 


Origin and breed history

The Sphynx cat is a hairless domestic cat breed. It originated in Canada, where it was further bred from naturally mutant cats in the 1960s. In 1971 the Sphynx cat was recognized as a cat breed in Canada. In Germany, the Sphynx cat is rather rare to find and has as many lovers, as critics.

Description

The Sphynx cat is a medium sized cat, whose characteristic is the almost complete hairlessness. The standard allows only a short, fine down. The skin is said to feel suede-like when stroked with the hand. Furthermore, wrinkles around the muzzle, between the ears and around the shoulders are described in the standard as desirable.

Some cats of this breed may lack tactile hairs. A report by the Expert Group on Animal Welfare and Pet Breeding on the interpretation of Section 11b of the German Animal Welfare Act recommends a ban on breeding in this case:

Tasthaare are an essential sensory organ for the cat. They are especially important for orientation in the dark, but also for catching and scanning prey, examining objects and establishing social contacts (BRUNNER, 1994; LEYHAUSEN, 1996). If they are missing or altered in such a way that their function is lost, this is to be evaluated as a physical damage, which restricts the cat in its ability for species-typical behavior in such a way that this leads to permanent suffering. Recommendation: Breeding ban (see page 15, No. I) for cats in which the tactile hairs are missing. *

Character and temperament

The Sphynx cat has a people-oriented, friendly nature. It can develop a close bond with its people, is intelligent and affectionate.

Attitude

The Sphynx cat is a domestic cat, which is best suited for the apartment. This is not due to their nature, but rather due to their hairlessness. For outdoors, the Sphynx cat may even get sunburn if exposed to the sun for too long. However, perfectly healthy animals feel comfortable even when walking in the garden.

A Sphynx cat feels very warm knowing the temperature of a healthy cat. Due to the partial lack of insulation of the fur, one feels approximately directly their body temperature of 38.3 to 39.0 °C. If the cat lacks tactile or whiskers, it may be handicapped in its ability to orient itself.

Education

The Sphynx cat, like any pedigree cat, is easy to train.

Care and health

Because they lack fur, Sphynx cats are sometimes sensitive to weather of all kinds. Exposure to sunlight can cause significant skin damage (e.g. sunburn) and can lead to the development of skin cancer. Some cats of this breed have a low fat layer and therefore little insulation from heat and cold. These cats can therefore catch cold or overheat very easily.

Diseases typical for the breed

Reliable information about hereditary diseases clustered in the population is not available for the Sphynx cat. However, since the gene pool for breeding the breed is quite small, diseases and allergies may occur if too much inbreeding occurs.

Nutrition/Food

The Sphynx cat may have higher energy and therefore nutritional requirements due to the lack of fur and therefore lack of insulation. This must be taken into account in the diet. In individual cases a dietary nutrition may be necessary. Healthy cats of this breed are problem-free boarders and do not need to be specially fed.


Russian blue breed portrait

 


Origin and breed history

The Russian Blue is a small to medium sized domestic cat with short, plush hair. As the name implies, the coat color is always blue or blue-gray. Its name suggests a Russian ancestry. According to the legend, it should come from the city of Arkhangelsk in the north of Russia. From there it is said to have been introduced to England by sailors as early as 1850. However, there is no solid evidence for this legend. One thing is for sure: The Russian Blue originates at least to a good part from the large pool of blue shorthair cats like with it also the British Shorthair in its blue form, British Blue, and the Carthusian cat.

There have always been breeders who were anxious to form their own peculiarities. Thus, the Russian Blue was created beginning in the 1930s and establishing itself as an independent breed cat after World War II. The Russian Blue was officially recognized by the Fédération Internationale Féline in 1949. In the meantime, three lines of the Russian Blue have emerged in breeding: The English type, which is stronger with a medium blue coat color, the Siberian/Scandinavian type, which is slightly smaller and shows a much darker coat, and the American type. The Russian Blue American type is said to be the most elegant and shows a very light coat. However, from the point of view of the health of this cat breed, splitting it into three lines is considered problematic.

Description

The Russian Blue is a small to medium sized pedigreed cat. It has a slender, long build. It should appear graceful, the legs fine and high, the neck long and straight. Size and weight depend greatly on the type or line in which it was bred. Males grow to 3 to 6, cats to 2.5 to 4 kilograms. It has a double coat, plush standing up, soft and silky. This is what the standard requires. As colors only shades of blue are allowed, but there all. These can range from a light to a dark blue-gray. The coat must be solid in any case. The eyes should be very large. The eye color of the Russian Blue is green, ideally vivid and emerald. Their ears should be large and pointed. The tail should be quite long and tapered.


Character and temperament

The adult Russian Blue is a very balanced, calm cat. She can develop a close bond. She is a real family cat. Russian Blue likes to move in nature, but her urge to do so is not so strongly developed. However, she loves to play. Suitable cat toys like a play fishing rod or a feather stick are a must. She is very cuddly and you like her alone ob dear appearance and her fluffy fur especially like to stroke and cuddle. She likes that too. Russian Blue are sociable and get along with other animal housemates without any problems - provided both sides had the chance to get used to each other.

Attitude

The Russian Blue is a calm house cat. It is very well suited for the apartment. The Russian Blue does not have to be an outdoor cat to feel comfortable. She is intelligent and observes her surroundings closely. The otherwise quiet Russian Blue is astonishing because of her great jumping power. So she manages to open the handle of a door without any problems. This must be kept in mind with her attitude. Otherwise she is undemanding and frugal regarding her keeping conditions. However, she needs the intimate relationship with her two-legged friends. She loves the shared experience with humans or animal partners in her family.

Education

The Russian Blue is easy to train. In the youth sometimes quite impetuous and impudent, she becomes clearly calmer after well one year. If she comes from a reputable breeder who has well cared for and socialized parents and puppies, she will naturally fit into the rules and habits of her family. With a little guidance, she will be housebroken quickly and easily.

Care and health

Coat care

The Russian Blue's coat only needs to be brushed from time to time. With a little feeling and skill, fur brushing can be turned into a social bonding ritual that is emotionally beneficial to both cat and human.

Diseases typical for the breed

Inbreeding is a major problem. The rather small gene pool of the Russian Blue is made even smaller by further splitting into three types (the English, Siberian/Scandinavian, and American types). Other hereditary diseases typical of pedigreed cats can also occur in the Russian Blue.

Nutrition/Food

The Russian Blue is usually a problem-free eater by cat standards. Due to inbreeding, a diet may be necessary.

Life expectancy

A Russian Blue can live 12 years. Inbreeding shortens the life expectancy drastically.

Buying a Russian Blue

If you want to get a Russian Blue, you can first look around in animal shelters. At the breeder's you should make sure that parents and puppies grow up in good conditions, especially with a close social connection to the human family. You should look at the pedigree. Here no ancestor should appear twice, in order to exclude too strong inbreeding. Both parents should be tested negative for the common hereditary diseases of pedigree cats. Serious breeders indicate this in their advertisements. Of course the kittens should be vaccinated, dewormed and chipped several times. A serious bred Russian Blue puppy should cost around 700 Euro.



Carthusian cat's breed portrait

 


Origin and history of the breed

The Carthusian cat is one of the oldest purposefully bred domestic cats. today it is also called Chartreux. Already in writings of the late Middle Ages, the Blue is described as a rather long-haired cat. As "Chat des Chartreux" or "Cartheuserkatze" it is documented in the oldest works of zoology of modern times. Perhaps it is the oldest pedigree cat at all, next to the Persian cat. The name Cartheusian is possibly derived from its typical black-bluish coat color. It used to remind of the color of the monks' working frocks. The history of the Carthusian cat is closely related to the British Blue, which today is listed as a color type of the British Shorthair cat. Until the 1970s, the Carthusian and British Blue formed a common gene pool.

It was purely a matter of discretion whether a breeder offered his kittens as Carthusian and as British Blue. It remained the same cat. Only later did the breeders begin to draw a line of separation for marketing reasons and proclaim two separate breeds. For both new creations, certain distinguishing features were conceived quasi from the hollow belly and have been purposefully bred ever since. The Carthusian cat remained in its shape at a rather slender domestic cat, received at the same time a somewhat unnaturally narrow head with very large eyes. The British Blue was bred rather compact, stocky with a broad, round, almost plush head. When the Fédération Internationale Féline was founded in 1949, one of its first official acts was to recognize the Carthusian cat. In connection with the split of the breed into Carthusian and British Blue, the standard was revised in 1977.

Description

The Carthusian cat is a medium-sized domestic cat. It has a strong but at the same time slender build with a broad, well-developed chest. Males weigh 6 to 7, cats 4 to 5 kilograms. The coat is shiny and lush in growth. It has a double coat where the hairs stand. The undercoat should be slightly woolly at the base. This is required by the standard. It must always have a uniform coat color. As colors only blue tones are permitted, there however all. These can range from a light to a very dark blue-gray. White hair like green eyes are not desired. A Carthusian cat with bright yellow eyes, for example, is like its sister, the British Blue, an extremely elegant as well as impressive appearance.

Character and temperament

The Carthusian is a very balanced cat in temperament. She still has a good bit of pleasant wildness in her, but at the same time she is simply sweet and seeks closeness to her humans. To him she can develop a close bond. She is a real family cat. Carthusian cats like to move in nature like any domestic cat, but their urge to do so is not so strongly developed. She also catches a mouse once in a while, if the opportunity is favorable. Suitable cat toys are just as well for her. She is very cuddly and one likes to stroke and cuddle her alone because of her lovely, trusting appearance and her fluffy fur. She likes that too. Carthusians are extremely sociable and get along with other animal housemates without any problems - provided both sides have had a chance to get used to each other.

Attitude

The Carthusian cat is an ideal house cat. It is very well suited for the apartment. Ideal, but not condition, is if a garden or a larger area is added. Unlike a normal house cat, the Carthusian will generally never stray far from the house. However, you never know with an unneutered male Carthusian cat on a bridal search. However, the Carthusian cat does not have to be an outdoor cat to be comfortable. It is undemanding and frugal with regard to its housing conditions, but needs the intimate relationship with its two-legged friends. She loves the common experience with the humans or the animal partners in her family.

Education

The Carthusian cat is easy to train. If she comes from a reputable breeder who has well cared for and socialized parents and puppies, she will fit into the rules and habits of her family by herself. With a little guidance, she will be housebroken quickly and easily. Carthusians take a long time, sometimes up to two years, to grow up properly.

Care and health

The Carthusian cat's coat can be brushed now and then; that's all it needs. With a little feeling and skill, fur brushing can be turned into a social bonding ritual that is emotionally beneficial to both cat and human.

Diseases typical for the breed

Sometimes inbreeding is a problem. Some hereditary diseases typical of pedigree cats can also occur in Carthusian cats.

Nutrition/Food

The Carthusian is usually an easy eater by cat standards.

Life expectancy

A Carthusian cat, healthily bred, can easily live 12 to 15 years.

Buying a Carthusian cat

If you want to get a Carthusian cat, you can first look around in animal shelters. At the breeder's you should make sure that parents and puppies grow up in good conditions, especially with a close social connection to the human family. You should look at the pedigree. Here no ancestor should appear twice, in order to exclude too strong inbreeding. Both parents should be tested negative for the common hereditary diseases of pedigree cats. Serious breeders indicate this in their advertisements. Of course the kittens should be vaccinated, dewormed and chipped several times. A reputable bred Carthusian cat puppy should cost around 700 Euros.

Wild cat's breed portrait



 Origin and breed history

Wild cats inhabit Europe, Africa, and western Asia. There are three subspecies: the European wild cat (Felis silvestris silvestris), the African wild cat (Felis silvestris libyca) and the Asian wild cat (Felis silvestris ornata). In addition, there is the descendant of these cats that we all know, our domestic cat (Felis silvestris catus). It has ancestors from all the mentioned wild cat forms, but on balance it descends almost exclusively from the dun cat. Here it is about the European wildcat. It also lives among us, but hardly anyone has ever seen it in the wild.

In contrast to the house cat it avoids humans. With its extremely sharp senses it notices the arrival of a biped long before we even suspect its proximity. Today, with the help of photo traps, we have a certain overview of their population. Our wild cat looks at first sight like a tabby house cat. However, it is much more massive and powerfully built. Even bigger are the differences in the way of life and the nature. It is a strict loner. On its hunts it roams huge areas. Kuder, in the hunter language for male, can cover so in one night up to 20 kilometers. The European wildcat loves open forest landscapes. However, it is very reluctant to move in clearings or areas without cover. Therefore, the urban sprawl of our landscape makes it very difficult.

The European wildcat has a completely different way of hunting than our domestic cat. It is a prowling or stalking hunter. Our domestic cat, on the other hand, is a sitting hunter. The diet of the wild cat is very special and not very flexible: it hunts only small mammals like mice or young rabbits. It is usually not interested in carrion, frogs, birds or insects. This makes it vulnerable to natural events such as extreme weather conditions, where it can hardly switch to other food. It cannot be tamed and in the thousands of years since the domestic cat came to Europe with humans, it has very rarely mixed with them.

feral cat

Description

Our wild cat looks like a tabby domestic cat at first glance. However, it is much more massive and powerfully built. Its tail is thick, rather short and ends bluntly. It has a typical three-ringed pattern. Their coat is denser and somewhat longer than that of the domestic cat. Their coat pattern appears rather washed out in contrast to the wild-colored domestic cats. On the back it carries a continuous black eel line. In addition, it has a flesh-colored nose tip. Our domestic cats have rather darker nose tips in many different colors. The European wild cat has a weight of 2.5 to 6.5 kilograms with a total length including tail up to one meter. Males are stronger than cats. As vocalizations they know only hissing and growling. The meowing of our house cats show only wild cat puppies.

Character and nature

Wildcats are solitary stalkers that sneak up on their prey unnoticed and by surprise attack with a jump

grasp. WildcatOur domestic cat, on the other hand, is - like its ancestor, the hawk cat - a stalker. It will wait for hours in front of a mouse hole and then strike with lightning speed. The European wildcat only socializes briefly during the mating season. This also contributes to the fact that it is considered the only cat species in the world that cannot be tamed. Even specimens raised from birth in the care of humans avoid humans and, even in captivity, approach them at best only to within two meters to pick up a desirable piece of food. They never allow themselves to be touched voluntarily.


Attitude

The European wildcat is completely unsuitable as a pet. It is a pure wild animal. Even raised in captivity by humans, it remains wild. If for various reasons it is necessary to keep them in an enclosure, it must be very large and, above all, provide ample options for the wild cat to retreat and hide. In the wild, it never returns to a hiding place found by a human. It avoids any encounter with a human far and wide.

Education

The European wildcat is completely resistant to education by humans.

Nutrition/Food

The European wildcat is a food specialist. Its main food is voles, wood mice, field mice or young hares and rabbits.

Life expectancy

In the wild, the European wildcat rarely lives over 4 years. Of a litter, only less than half survive the first year of life. Under optimal conditions, wildcats in captivity reach an age of up to twelve years.

Buy wildcat

The wildcat lives exclusively in the wild and cannot be purchased.

Domestic cat's breed portrait

  


Origin and breed history

The domestic cat is the most popular pet of the Germans. But we know, strictly speaking, still quite little about her. She was a stepchild of research for a long time. Again and again it is claimed that a domestic cat - in contrast to a dog - could not establish a personal relationship with humans. Cat lovers know quite well that their darlings build a close personal bond and can distinguish very well between individuals.

In March 2017, the first study was published, which also seems to scientifically confirm such experiences of cat lovers. The origin of our domestic cat is clear today. It is not descended from the European wild cat living in our latitudes. Their ancestors live in the north of Africa, the Near East up to the Caspian Sea as well as on Sardinia and Corsica. It is the African wild cat or falcon cat, scientifically called "Felis silvestris lybica". The dun cat probably sought the proximity of the newly settled humans almost 10,000 years ago.

With the introduction of agriculture, storage facilities became necessary. And where there are supplies, mice are not far away. The ideal food for a dun cat. Thus, a process of rapprochement developed on the basis of mutual benefit. The dun cat reduced some of its shyness towards humans and people appreciated the services of the cat.

In ancient times, and especially in ancient Egypt, the cat was worshipped like a goddess and is preserved for posterity in thousands of mummies. Without the help of the cat, there would have been many a famine more. The ancient Egyptians knew this better than we do today and so the cat was treated with the greatest respect. With the agriculture the already to the house cat became Falbkatze came to Europe. As a domestic cat on the farms, however, it always retained a piece of wildness. It lived with people but not with them. Only in recent times the domestic cat conquered the apartments of the big cities and became from the domestic animal also the home animal and social partner of humans.

11.5 million house cats, inclusive of the race cats, populate Germany today. From the economic factor house cat as an indispensable guardian of the grain stores before mice became an economic factor as a consumer. Every year in Germany alone 3.3 billion euros are spent on cat food, scratching posts and other utensils. For many people, their cat has become one of the most important social contacts.

The social life of domestic cats among themselves has hardly been researched. However, it has at least one, even if only in phases. This is in contrast to its relative the European wild cat. This one is a tight, aloof loner and has a completely different way of hunting. It is extremely shy towards humans and is considered untamable. All this has probably led to the fact that domestic and wild cats have hardly ever mixed in our latitudes over all these years. The descendants of the wild dun cat became the domesticated and highly valued house cat of today's man. From the domestic cat and its regional peculiarities, one has formed the so-called pedigree cats for almost a hundred years. Constantly new ones are created. Depending on the counting method, there are supposed to be about 60 different breeds, 48 of which are recognized by the Fédération Internationale Féline.

Description

We see the domestic cat in many shapes and colors. On average, its body is fifty centimeters long and weighs four kilograms. But this is only the average. Their weight can vary from three to eight kilograms, without the 8 kg cat being overweight. This is a result of adaptation to different conditions of nutrition, climate, competition, depending on where it lives. Male cats are usually larger and stronger and have a more massive head. The tail of the cat is about 25 to 30 centimeters long. Coat length varies from short to - rather rarely - medium length. The long hair of some pedigree cats is due to a genetic mutation that is naturally lost in freely mating cats.

With the coat colors we see almost all variants: pure black with or without markings, mackerel wild-colored and so for the layman hardly distinguishable from a wild cat up to the three-color multicolored house cats. Only pure white one sees hardly once. Also here nature seems to take care that characteristics, which are often connected with defect genes and cause physical damage - in pure white often deafness and eye diseases - can not persist. You can tell a cat is a nimble, extremely agile hunter with extremely keen senses. Their eyes have a vertical slit-shaped pupil, which becomes large and round at the highest excitement. A cat's ability to see at night is almost proverbial.

Character and nature

The nature of a domestic cat depends largely on its individual development. There are more or less wild house cats and equally cuddly tame house cats with close ties to his humans. The tameness of your domestic cat depends on many factors. It starts with their lineage. If the parents were wild strays and the cat gave birth to and raised its puppies in a hideout, the starting point is bad. In the first 2 to 8 weeks is an imprinting phase for the cat puppies. Here the course is set. If the puppies, ideally guided by their mother, find contact with loving people, they will be trusting throughout their lives. If they grow up wild, for example in a barn or a condemned house, and if their mother teaches them to be afraid of people, cats can be imprinted on this basic mood for the rest of their lives.

Imprinted and socialized to humans, domestic cats can be very affectionate. They understand their humans quite well. They know best how to articulate their wishes. The saying of the writer Kurt Tucholsky "Dogs have masters, cats have staff" is quite true. There are divas that have the whole family under control. Domestic cats still remain hunters at their core. They love games where they can chase after a "prey" coming out of hiding. And in real life, domestic cats still prove their worth as mouse exterminators. Domestic cats, like their ancestors, the hawk cat, are hunters of sitting mice. They can wait for hours in front of the mouse hole, perceive every movement with their sharp senses and can then strike with lightning speed.

Attitude

The keeping of a domestic cat is unproblematic. It can cope even in the smallest apartment. First you have to decide whether the cat should be an apartment cat or a free roamer. There are good arguments for both. As an outdoor cat, the cat can better meet its needs. At the same time, it is thus exposed to the danger of perishing in our dense traffic or from poison bait. Also the issue of neutering males to prevent uncontrolled reproduction, which then only further fills up the animal shelters, should be considered. Otherwise, all she needs is her litter box, which must be cleaned daily. A cat needs attention, but respectful and never pushy. So she is also a play partner for children. Against their will runs as well as so nothing. Domestic cats can be kept individually or together or with other pets such as dogs. It is crucial that all are accustomed to each other nice and early. Interestingly, the cats are then usually the bosses of the dogs.

Education

A domestic cat cannot be trained like a dog. But it adapts to certain rules and must also get used to the fact that the two-legged friend is the boss in the house. The power games are sometimes very subtle on the part of the cat and he always manages to take the reins. When a cat comes into the house, the first thing it has to do is get used to doing its business in the designated place. This is usually not a problem, they bury their droppings by nature. Only particularly dominant specimens do not do this.

Care and health

The domestic cat does not need any special care, so it is enough to check and brush the fur from time to time. In old age, you should also keep an eye on the teeth and in case of doubt, consult a veterinarian.

Diseases typical for the breed

The normal domestic cat usually enjoys a very robust health. Usually only the vaccination or possibly necessary castrations require a visit to the vet.


Holy birman breed portrait

 


Origin and history of the breed

The Sacred Burmese or Birman cat was developed in France in the first half of the 20th century. It is supposed to be the golden mean of the two classic pedigree cats, the short-haired Siamese and the long-haired Persian. Today, it could also be the smaller sister of the Ragdoll cat, which is also medium-long haired.

The Sacred Burmese, which is the official name of this domestic cat breed, is a partial albino like the Ragdoll, whose coat has the distinctive colors with the points: On a bright base color, which may appear in a wide variety of shades, lie dark spots, the so-called points, especially in the head area.

Typical for the Birman cat are the white paws, called gloves. The Burmese cat must not be confused with the Burmese cat, because the Burmese cat is a different, short-haired cat breed. Since Burma and Burma are both old names of the state in Southeast Asia now called Myanmar, it is easy to get confused here. The Sacred Burmese was officially recognized by the Fédération Internationale Féline in 1949.

Description

The Burmese cat is a small to medium sized cat with medium length hair. It is easily recognized by its fluffy coat with the typical point colors. The face always wears a dark mask. Their coat is semi-long to occasionally long and has a silky texture. On the head, the coat should be rather short, then form a collar of longer hair on the neck, which continues on the flanks. The Birman cat has little undercoat.

Distinctive and typical is the deep blue color of their eyes. Their tail should be of medium length and form a feather bush. The Sacred Birman belongs to the Point cats. With her all Point colors are permitted. These special color characteristics of all Point cats are produced by a mutation, a partial albinism, called acromelanism. The body fur is lightened due to the consequences of this genetic defect, while on the cooler regions of the body like face, ears, legs and tail the so called points are produced, which are darker to completely dark brown in color.

The kittens are born white and darken only later. The legs of the Birman cat are short and strong. The standard prescribes for the Birman cat mandatory so-called gloves. With gloves the pure white paws are called. A Birman tomcat weighs between 4 and 6 kilograms, the Birman cat should be lighter and weigh only up to 4 kilograms.

Character and nature

The Birman cat has a very people-oriented, friendly and gentle nature. She is simply sweet and seeks the closeness of people with whom she can develop a close bond. She is a real family cat. The Holy Birman has alert senses and good reflexes and likes to play extensively. For this purpose, the trade offers a lot of suitable cat toys such as a play fishing rod or a spring rod. With it they can play extensively. And they do this until old age. Birman cats also like to move once in nature, but their urge to do so is not particularly developed compared to normal house cats.

Attitude

The Birman cat is an ideal house cat for the apartment. Apart from the fur care it is undemanding in its keeping conditions, but needs the intimate relationship with its two-legged friends. She loves the shared experience with humans or animal partners in her family and does not have to be an outdoor cat to feel completely at home. In fact, she is not really suited to be a free-rover for one very simple reason: she is too people-friendly! She would approach any biped in a friendly way and let herself be cuddled.

In view of her extremely attractive appearance, the temptation can then be too great for a stranger to abduct her without further ado. The Holy Burmese does not like to be left alone for a long time. She likes to have a suitable second cat at her side. Birmans are sociable and get along with other animal companions without any problems. However, both, cat and for example a dog, should have been accustomed to each other with patience.

Education

The Birman cat can be educated well. If she comes from a reputable breeder who has well cared for and socialized parents and puppies, she will fit into the rules and habits of her family by herself. With a little guidance, she will be housebroken quickly and easily.

Care and health

Coat care

The dense coat of the Birman cat should be brushed regularly, several times a week. However, it is relatively easy to care for, as it has little tendency to mat due to the lack of undercoat. The fur brushing can be made with some feeling and skill to a ritual of social bonding, which is emotionally very good for cat and humans.

Diseases typical for the breed

Some breedings of the Birman cat suffer from strong inbreeding, which can lead to immune deficiencies, sickliness and shortened life expectancy. In Birman cats there are a number of hereditary diseases that are common in breeding, such as anemia, heart disease, or some eye diseases that are a result of their acromelanism. Among others, PRA is widespread, which leads to blindness. However, not all cats must be affected by these diseases.


Persian cat's breed portrait

 


Origin and breed history

The Persian cat is one of the oldest breed cats at all. Probably they already existed in antiquity. However, their history is unclear. Already in 1620, the Italian traveler Pietro Della Valle reported a beautiful long-haired cat in the Persian city of Khorasan. The Frenchman Nicolas Fabri de Peiresc is said to have introduced her to France later. Since then it was called French cat. In the middle of the 19th century, the British took the lead in breeding Persian cats. Then, until 50 years ago, the name Angora cat was common. The Angora cat is highlighted in Brehms Tierleben in 1915 "as one of the most beautiful cats there is". Recent studies by geneticists suggest its roots in the long-haired Russian cats. So there is still a lot of room for speculation and serious research concerning the origin and history of the Persian cat.

It is not necessary to describe the Persian, because it is known to every cat- and animal lover. Its long hair and large head with a short muzzle are distinctive. She is a big cat, which seems sovereign and sublime. She takes life with a serenity rare for cats. She has almost completely abandoned the wildness of her ancestors and became a perfect, cuddly and faithful companion of people. Unfortunately, humans do not take this friendship too seriously. The Persian cat is a cat breed plagued by torture breeding. Only in 2016, the German veterinary associations called for the avoidance of torture breeding under the motto "Not cute, but tortured", mentioning the Persian cat asudrücklich.

Their problem is the increasingly shorter nose and the associated deformations of the entire skull. These lead among other things to serious breathing and eye problems. A Persian cat does not need a malformed skull to be a true and typical Persian. This is only an erroneous development of the last years, which must be corrected absolutely. In addition, the Persian cat is multiplied in real animal factories and then marketed EU-wide via the Internet. For centuries, the Persian cat had a completely normal, functional, healthy muzzle. Already since the middle of the 19th century the Persian cat has been systematically bred starting from England and marketed as a valuable commodity. Exhibitions have been organized and championships awarded ever since. With its foundation in 1949, the Persian cat was also immediately recognized by the Fédération Internationale Féline (FiFe) and a binding standard was established.

Description

The Persian cat is a medium to large longhaired cat. It should have a strong body and a large, powerful head. The standard requires a round, massive, very broad skull. But at the same time requires a nose "short, broad, with a distinct stop. The bridge of the nose, as well as the nose leather must be broad. Nostrils are well opened to allow free and easy breathing." This is the O-ton of the standard of FiFe, which should actually prevent the worst excesses in the current breeding of the Persian. Unfortunately, the reality looks different. The already mentioned excesses of the breeding, which are to be characterized as torture breeding, concern primarily the length of the nose like the entire form of the skull. The extremely recessed nose hinders free breathing and damages the tear ducts with the consequence of persistent watering eyes, inflammations in the nose and throat area and even discomfort during food intake.


Birth is also not infrequently problematic due to the oversized heads, requiring a cesarean section. White coat color can be genetically coupled with deafness. Fortunately, there are still breeders who prefer the old type with long nose and healthy skull shape even if it does not meet the wishes of the breed judges and prevents championships. Persian cats are cozy also from their body shape. Males can weigh up to 9 kilograms without being overweight, while cats weigh from 4 to 7 kilograms. The long-haired Persian cat has a common standard with the Exotic Shorthair cat, bred since 1933, since 1983. The Exotic Shorthair is a Persian with short coat, which is accordingly easier to maintain.

Character and temperament

The Persian cat has a very people-oriented, friendly and gentle nature. She is simply loving and seeks the closeness of her people. She can develop a close bond here. She is a real family cat. She is attentive and very intelligent and knows her humans very well. Persian cats love the quiet life most of all with their humans. Of course, they like to move in nature once in a while, but they can also be kept exclusively in the apartment. Persian cats have a wonderful calming and relaxing aura. They are affectionate, but do not let themselves be taken in and remain their own proud personality.

Attitude

A Persian cat is the ideal house cat for the apartment. It is undemanding and frugal with regard to its keeping conditions, apart from grooming and healthy breeding. However, it needs a close relationship with its owners. She loves to be with people as well as with the animal partners in her family. However, both, cat and for example a dog, should have been accustomed to each other with patience. She does not have to be a free roamer to feel completely at home. However, she does not like to be left alone for a long time. They are extremely sociable and gets along easily with children, all family friends and animal housemates.